Versatile Orange

Besides the common way of juicing, orange is also a popular ingredient to use in dipping, dressing and gravy.

I came across a salad the other day whereby the restaurant replaced apple cider with fresh orange juice as salad dressing. On my, it transformed an otherwise boring salad to a real appetizer! Needless to say, it makes children begging for more salad without much effort for parents to force greens in their meal. Bingo! It’s really as easy as it sounds, just replace your usual apple cider salad dressing with freshly squeeze juice of 1 to 2 orange, and toss away for a healthy meal starter.

It’s really as easy as it sounds, just replace your usual apple cider salad dressing with freshly squeeze juice of 1 to 2 orange, and toss away for a healthy meal starter. 

What do we do with the orange skin? Food wastage is common first world problem and we can do our part to minimize that. After extracting the orange juice, wash the skin with salt water. Pat dry and scrap the rind from the skin. Save the rind for orange pancakes/crepe. Yes, you read me right, pancakes/crepe. I would not recommend orange juice in the pancake/crepe batter. From experience, the juice may be too sour for the pancake and we may end up adding more sugar to mask it. What’s the point, right? The rind from 2 oranges will do just the perfect job in giving a tinge of natural orange-y aroma to the pancake. However, be careful not to scrap too deep as the white part of the orange skin gives a bitter and pungent taste.

Besides veggies, orange goes really well with poultry, especially duck. While some braise the duck with whole oranges, I am sharing a simple gravy recipe to add more zing to your roast duck or roast chicken.

Besides veggies, orange goes really well with poultry, especially duck.

Orange Gravy 

Juice and rind from 4 oranges

1 tablespoon cornflour in 1/4 cup water (thickener)

1/2 cup water

2 tablespoon sugar

2 cloves garlic, finely chopped

Salt and pepper to taste

  1. Saute garlic and orange rind with oil over medium heat.
  2. When the aroma fills the air, add orange juice and water. Once it starts to bubble, add the cornflour mixture and give it a quick stir.
  3. Add the sugar, salt and pepper to liking. Turn off heat and pour over your roast duck or chicken.

I hope you see orange in a different light now, not the boring o’ orange anymore.

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